fbpx
ADVOCATES FOR THE INJURED
OUR PASSION IS TO OBTAIN JUSTICE

New Illinois Car Seat Law Taking Effect in 2019

Published on Aug 23, 2018 at 7:21 pm in Car Accidents.

Effective January 1, 2019, children under the age of two in Illinois must ride in rear-facing car seats. Governor Bruce Rauner signed the bill that established the law in August 2018.

While there are no exceptions to this law, children taller than 40 inches or weighing more than 40 pounds are allowed in front-facing car seats. The new law leaves the penalties at the discretion of authorities. Illinois State Police say violators could face a $75 fine for a first offense and up to a $200 fine for a second offense.

This new law coincides with the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) recommendations. It is estimated that 59 percent of children’s car seats are used incorrectly. It’s important for parents and guardians to choose the right car seat for their child, install the seat correctly, and understand their car seat’s warranty. According to the AAP, parents should take the following guidelines into consideration when transporting their children:

  • Infants and toddlers up to age two should ride in rear-facing car seats.
  • Young children, until at least age four, should ride in a car seat with a five-point harness. Weight and height should be taken into consideration and compared to the manufacturer’s recommendations.
  • School-age children, until at least the age of eight, should ride in a booster seat to ensure their seatbelt fits properly.
  • Children should ride in the back of a vehicle until at least age 13.

Car Crashes: Do I have a case?

Published on Feb 21, 2017 at 5:56 pm in Car Accidents.

Unfortunately, many of us will at some point be injured in a car accident.  Afterwards, especially if you think that the other drive was at fault, you might wonder “do I have a case?”  Let’s look at the legal requirements for “having a case” and then let’s talk about them the way real people talk.

In legal jargon, in order to make a legal recovery in an automobile accident, the injured person has to establish the following:  1.  The other driver was negligent.  2.  That other driver’s negligence proximately cause harm to you.  3.  You suffered actual harm.

What does all this actually mean?  Negligence simply means that someone did something he or she should not have done or did not do something that he or she should have done.  We have all taken driver’s education in high school and have studied the Rules of the Road.  The Rules of the Road is one of the most important resources for determining if a driver was “negligent.”  For instance, did the other driver run a stop sign?  Did the other driver turn left in front of you as you were approaching the intersection?  Was he speeding?  Talking on his cell phone?  If you can demonstrate that the other driver violated the Rules of the Road, you are on your way to showing that he was negligent.

FREE CONSULTATIONS

LET US HELP YOU TODAY - CALL US 24/7

Want to speak to an attorney? Unsure if you have a case? Fill out the form below and we’ll reach out to you as quickly as possible.